A TEACHER’S GUIDE TO POPUP FOREST & NYC NATURE

 

New York City has more than 53,000 acres of open space and 778 native plant species to discover. So why don't New Yorkers know about their nearby nature? Wild plants are especially under-appreciated. Native plants help define our city and create a unique sense of place. They are also critical to urban biodiversity and habitat for wildlife. And being in nature is good for you.  Let's teach kids about the nature right in their own backyard. Click here for link to resources for grades 1st through 12th: dropbox folder with documents and slides.

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ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

 
 Really spectacular  interactive map  of natural areas in New York City, courtesy of The Natural Areas Conservancy. Hover and click to discover the types of plant and animal species, including those that are rare or threatened, in 51 different city-owned parks. The Natural Areas Conservancy works in partnership with NYC Parks to champion 20,000 acres of city-owned forests and wetlands for the benefit and enjoyment of all. They promote nature’s diversity and resilience across the five boroughs.   Click through for website.

Really spectacular interactive map of natural areas in New York City, courtesy of The Natural Areas Conservancy. Hover and click to discover the types of plant and animal species, including those that are rare or threatened, in 51 different city-owned parks. The Natural Areas Conservancy works in partnership with NYC Parks to champion 20,000 acres of city-owned forests and wetlands for the benefit and enjoyment of all. They promote nature’s diversity and resilience across the five boroughs. Click through for website.

  "Forever Wild: Nature in New York City"  is an initiative of NYC Parks to protect and preserve the most ecologically valuable lands within the five boroughs. The 51 "Forever Wild" nature preserves include over 8,700 acres of towering forests, vibrant wetlands, and expansive meadows - but have no legal protections. These vital open spaces are home to flying squirrels, bald eagles, and fascinating rare plants. They also give New Yorkers the chance to walk in the woods, paddle a stream, and observe wildlife.   Click through for the website.

"Forever Wild: Nature in New York City" is an initiative of NYC Parks to protect and preserve the most ecologically valuable lands within the five boroughs. The 51 "Forever Wild" nature preserves include over 8,700 acres of towering forests, vibrant wetlands, and expansive meadows - but have no legal protections. These vital open spaces are home to flying squirrels, bald eagles, and fascinating rare plants. They also give New Yorkers the chance to walk in the woods, paddle a stream, and observe wildlife. Click through for the website.

 
  "The Country in the City"  provides information on some of New York City's best-known natural areas. Here you'll find transportation information, maps, and an overview of habitats and wild plants and animals found in Pelham Bay Park in Bronx, Marine Park in Brooklyn, Inwood Hill Park in Manhattan, Alley Pond Park in Queens, and the Greenbelt in Staten Island. Also features descriptions of several urban ecosystems, including salt marshes, meadows, freshwater wetlands, and forests.   Click through for pdf publication.

"The Country in the City" provides information on some of New York City's best-known natural areas. Here you'll find transportation information, maps, and an overview of habitats and wild plants and animals found in Pelham Bay Park in Bronx, Marine Park in Brooklyn, Inwood Hill Park in Manhattan, Alley Pond Park in Queens, and the Greenbelt in Staten Island. Also features descriptions of several urban ecosystems, including salt marshes, meadows, freshwater wetlands, and forests. Click through for pdf publication.

  "Gardening with New York City Native Plants"  provides information on why and how to start a native plant garden in the Big Apple. Here you'll find information on what makes a plant native, introduced, or invasive; reasons for going native in your garden, and suggestions for sunny window boxes, potted shade gardens, groundcover, attracting butterflies and birds and showy trees and shrubs. All species listed are native to New York and hardy to zone 5.   Click through for pdf publication.

"Gardening with New York City Native Plants" provides information on why and how to start a native plant garden in the Big Apple. Here you'll find information on what makes a plant native, introduced, or invasive; reasons for going native in your garden, and suggestions for sunny window boxes, potted shade gardens, groundcover, attracting butterflies and birds and showy trees and shrubs. All species listed are native to New York and hardy to zone 5. Click through for pdf publication.

 
 New York City native plants include mosses, ferns, grasses, sedges and rushes, wildflowers, trees, shrubs and woody vines. They are an integral part of our ecosystems, and the building blocks of our local biodiversity. Yet the city has already lost more than 40% of its native plants, due to urban development and other human activities. What can you do to help support local wildflowers?   Click through for website.

New York City native plants include mosses, ferns, grasses, sedges and rushes, wildflowers, trees, shrubs and woody vines. They are an integral part of our ecosystems, and the building blocks of our local biodiversity. Yet the city has already lost more than 40% of its native plants, due to urban development and other human activities. What can you do to help support local wildflowers? Click through for website.

 The Mannahatta Project used landscape ecology and historical maps to uncover what New York looked like before it was a city. Now the Welikia Project, it was expanded to encompass all five boroughs. Discover New York City’s original ecology and compare it what we have today in the Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn, Staten Island and the waters in-between.   Click through for website.

The Mannahatta Project used landscape ecology and historical maps to uncover what New York looked like before it was a city. Now the Welikia Project, it was expanded to encompass all five boroughs. Discover New York City’s original ecology and compare it what we have today in the Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn, Staten Island and the waters in-between. Click through for website.